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There are so many software engineer entry level products out there, but these 5 have been the most helpful for me. I hope this list will help you find some new tools to work with!

1) Atom

2) GitKraken

3) PyCharm Community Edition

4) VMware Fusion Pro 10 and Workstation Player 12

5) Visual Studio Code

This blog post is a work-in-progress. It’s not finished yet, but I want to share it with you now because there are so many great ideas in here for new tools that might help you or your team become more productive! Please comment on what works best for you and if anything doesn’t make sense–I’ll be sure to come back and edit this post as needed. Thank you for reading!

The software engineer entry level products I can’t live without: Part One – Atom, GitKraken, PyCharm Community Edition, VMware Fusion Pro & Workstation Player 12 (Visual Studio Code coming soon!) was published March 2018 by [author].

Evernote:

I use Evernote for everything from my grocery list to writing out design ideas. It’s also great for storing receipts and other paper documents, as well a creating meeting notes and project details.

TextExpander:

Type once and have it repeat again and again with just one keystroke! This saves me SO much time when typing repetitive phrases or copying boilerplate content like business cards into emails.

Dropbox Paper:

A new take on the old fashioned Word doc that lets you share your work in realtime with others, comment on drafts, leave feedback right inside the document itself without having to email back and forth constantly about changes  so perfect if you are collaborating remotely at any point.

 Slack:

The perfect place to keep in touch with my remote team and stay on top of projects that are ongoing, as well as chat about updates/progress throughout the day – it’s a lifesaver not having to email back and forth all day long when I can just ping someone for an update or send them some feedback right from my phone. It also has integrations with countless other apps like Dropbox Paper so you don’t have to switch between apps during meetings!

Trello:

A project management tool for collaborating effectively across teams. You can assign tasks within cards, add due dates (or recurring ones!), attach files, set up separate boards depending on the stage of your work if needed, and create custom fields to track progress. In the past, I’ve used Trello for planning out content calendars with my team or creating a step-by-step guide of what we need from engineering before starting on a new project so that everyone’s on the same page (especially since it can be helpful for remote teams).

Asana:

A task management app that you can use to plan your day ahead in order of importance, set deadlines for tasks, upload files like presentations/reports/docs as well as attach related links if needed – think emailing yourself an attachment right into Asana! You can also organize projects by assigning individual members their own columns depending on where they’re at in the process; this is helpful in larger teams where you might have different roles.

Figma:

A design tool (think Sketch) that allows developers/designers alike the ability to create prototypes, wireframes, UI components and more collaboratively through a shared interface so everyone can stay on top of their work without having to switch between multiple programs that are slightly less user friendly. You can also save your designs within the program which is nice when we’re working remotely or just need something quick specific saved for later.

 Gmail:

A free email service that you can access from any device and lets me manage my inbox efficiently so I never miss an important message. It has a ton of features too, but what really comes in handy is the labels function which allowed me to organize emails into “projects” or “conversations.” This came in super helpful when we used Google Docs for group projects because it was easy to find all messages related specifically to our project!

GitHub:

A social coding platform where developers come together (typically remotely) and work on code collaboratively. You can create repositories – essentially a repo for each individual assignment/project that contains your files, code changes & commits, updates made by collaborators, and comments.

BitBucket:

A code hosting service that enables developers to collaborate on projects, while tracking changes & creating visibility of who is working on what when.

Slack:

Provides a messaging platform for teams which includes channels (chat rooms), private chat threads with individuals or groups, and archived messages in searchable conversations via the app’s search function.

Allows team members to stay connected by sending messages, sharing files, collaborating in chat rooms with the rest of the team. 

Intercom:

Allows me to connect with customers by managing conversations through live chat, email & social media, as well as providing customer data so we’re always making informed decisions about who needs support or what new features they might be interested in seeing.

The post is broken up into five different sections – one for each product/tool mentioned (BitBucket, Slack, Trello, Asana and Intercom). The text below should describe each entry level software engineer tool listed above. If you don’t have any knowledge about a certain product, you can just write “I don’t know what this is.”

 

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